Sheffield Hallam University installs new Chancellor

Sheffield Hallam University’s new Chancellor has taken the ceremonial helm at the institution after being officially installed.

Baroness Helena Kennedy QC, a leading criminal barrister and human rights champion, took part in the official installation ceremony at Cutlers’ Hall in Sheffield city centre yesterday afternoon

She takes over from Professor the Lord Robert Winston, who has been Chancellor for 17 years and is retiring this year.

A Labour peer in the House of Lords, Baroness Kennedy has spent much of her career fighting for the underdog and championing women’s rights and civil liberties, firmly believing in the power of education to transform lives.

During an impressive legal career she has acted in many high profile criminal trials including that relating to the Brighton bombing attack on the British cabinet in 1986, the successful Guildford Four appeal in 1989 and the Michael Bettaney espionage case in 1984. She also acted as junior counsel for Moors murderer Myra Hindley at her 1974 trial for plotting to escape from Hollo

way Prison.

Speaking about her appointment Baroness Kennedy said: “I have always been very interested in widening participation and I have been committed to the business of giving opportunities to people to access higher education who might not have expected it to be in their families. That was my background and higher education changed my life. I love the fact that Sheffield Hallam really does do that in a very serious way.

“Over the last three years I’ve got to know what Sheffield Hallam does and I liked it, so when I was approached about being Chancellor, I was delighted because it really does speak to my heart and the things that I care about.

“I love Sheffield, it’s nice to be here, it’s going to be a wonderful experience.”

Baroness Kennedy QC already has a well-established relationship with Sheffield Hallam University as patron of its Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice. She was also the recipient of an honorary doctorate from the University in 2014.

Welcoming Baroness Kennedy QC to the University, Vice-Chancellor Professor Sir Chris Husbands said: “Our vision is to become the world’s leading applied university, transforming lives and creating opportunities for people from all backgrounds. I am really looking forward to working with Helena to help bring this plan to fruition.

“Her track record and commitment to education speaks for itself. She is a formidable person and her insight and knowledge will be invaluable to Sheffield Hallam and the wider region.

“I would also like to express my thanks, and that of the University, to Professor the Lord Winston. His service as our Chancellor for the past seventeen years has been remarkable, during which time his commitment to Sheffield Hallam, our students and wider community, has been outstanding.”

Professor the Lord Winston said: “It has been an extraordinary honour to serve as the Chancellor of Sheffield Hallam University during the last 17 years. During that time, I have seen the university grow in stature and flourish.

“I have been humbled by meeting tens of thousands of our students at their graduation. I have constantly been most proud at their success and have watched their progress with the deepest admiration.

“This university is increasingly influential and I look forward to seeing it continue ever upwards. I am truly delighted that Helena Kennedy is taking on this privileged role as its chancellor. The university could not have chosen a wiser or a better human being.

“It remains to me to thank the excellent staff and the university community for their warmth and massive support during my appointment.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left Sir Bob Kerslake, SHU Chair of Governors, Baroness Helena Kennedy QC, Professor the Lord Winston and SHU Vice Chancellor Sir Chris Husbands at the installation ceremony at Cutlers’ Hall

Baroness Helena Kennedy QC receives her robe from Sir Bob Kerslake with Professor the Lord Winston, right.

Source: Sheffield Hallam University

 

Planning approved for new food engineering centre

Planning permission has been granted for Sheffield Hallam University’s new home for the National Centre of Excellence for Food Engineering.

The new Centre will sit alongside Sheffield Olympic Legacy Park, and will become the latest University facility on the site, following in the footsteps of the Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre (AWRC).

Plans for the research-led centre include laboratories, workshops and teaching spaces with work focusing on engineering processes of food production and addressing an industry recognised shortage of food engineering expertise.

The application has now been approved by Sheffield City Council and will play a strategic role in developing advanced engineering capability for the food and drink industry, providing a major competitive advantage to the sector.

Work is expected to begin on site in September 2018 with the centre due to open in June 2019.

The Centre is designed to tackle food industry challenges such as productivity, producing more for less, minimising waste and reducing costs. It will support the food and drink

industry by developing new and enhanced facilities, processes and equipment and creating a knowledgeable workforce with experience of leading engineering systems and processes.

The centre, and the associated Master’s degree, MEng Food Engineering, are supported by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and have been developed in partnership with the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) and the National Skills Academy for Food and Drink, along with funding from the European Regional Development Fund.

Dr Martin Howarth, director of the centre, said: “The centre will support the food and drink industry to develop and implement new and enhanced facilities, processes and equipment, to keep the UK at the forefront of capability and efficiency in a very competitive sector.

“It will also enhance the development of a highly educated and knowledgeable workforce, through staff development and supporting employees with experience of leading engineering systems and processes.

“This project builds on our existing strong track record of providing excellent research and knowledge transfer, and of working in partnership with industry to develop education programmes that are designed to support companies by creating highly skilled and employable graduates, ready for the world of work.”

Rachel Clark, director of trade and investment at Sheffield City Region, said: “I’m so glad that we’ve reached this crucial step in bringing the National Centre of Excellence for Food Engineering to our region.

“Sheffield City Region is famed worldwide for its excellence in innovation and strong heritage in manufacturing and engineering. In collaboration with our city region’s two universities, our businesses are driving forward cutting-edge technology and building on that reputation, ensuring that we’re increasingly becoming a place where companies want to invest, grow and thrive.

“This centre will also be a major piece in the creation of the Health Innovation Campus, a public-private partnership which will lead the way in research and drive wider growth and development across our forward-thinking city region.”

NCEFE

The National Centre of Excellence for Food Engineering at Sheffield Hallam is designed to tackle challenges in the food industry head on. It supports the food and drink industry by developing new and enhanced facilities, processes and equipment and creating a knowledgeable workforce with experience of leading engineering systems and processes. The centre and the associated masters degree – the MEng Food Engineering – are supported by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and have been developed in partnership with the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) and the National Skills Academy (NSA) for Food and Drink.

The National Centre of Excellence for Food Engineering is part of the Faculty of ACES (Arts, Computing, Engineering and Science). With more than 7,300 students and 500 staff, the faculty of ACES brings together creative and technical disciplines including art, design, communications, media arts, journalism, cultural management, computing, mathematics, aeronautical, electrical, materials and mechanical engineering.

Source: Sheffield Hallam University

 

 

 

Planning approved for new food engineering centre

Planning permission has been granted for Sheffield Hallam University’s new home for the National Centre of Excellence for Food Engineering.

The new Centre will sit alongside Sheffield Olympic Legacy Park, and will become the latest University facility on the site, following in the footsteps of the Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre (AWRC).

Plans for the research-led centre include laboratories, workshops and teaching spaces with work focusing on engineering processes of food production and addressing an industry recognised shortage of food engineering expertise.

The application has now been approved by Sheffield City Council and will play a strategic role in developing advanced engineering capability for the food and drink industry, providing a major competitive advantage to the sector.

Work is expected to begin on site in September 2018 with the centre due to open in June 2019.

The Centre is designed to tackle food industry challenges such as productivity, producing more for less, minimising waste and reducing costs. It will support the food and drink industry by developing new and enhanced facilities, processes and equipment and creating a knowledgeable workforce with experience of leading engineering systems and processes.

The centre, and the associated Master’s degree, MEng Food Engineering, are supported by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and have been developed in partnership with the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) and the National Skills Academy for Food and Drink, along with funding from the European Regional Development Fund.

Dr Martin Howarth, director of the centre, said: “The centre will support the food and drink industry to develop and implement new and enhanced facilities, processes and equipment, to keep the UK at the forefront of capability and efficiency in a very competitive sector.

“It will also enhance the development of a highly educated and knowledgeable workforce, through staff development and supporting employees with experience of leading engineering systems and processes.

“This project builds on our existing strong track record of providing excellent research and knowledge transfer, and of working in partnership with industry to develop education programmes that are designed to support companies by creating highly skilled and employable graduates, ready for the world of work.”

Rachel Clark, director of trade and investment at Sheffield City Region, said: “I’m so glad that we’ve reached this crucial step in bringing the National Centre of Excellence for Food Engineering to our region.

“Sheffield City Region is famed worldwide for its excellence in innovation and strong heritage in manufacturing and engineering. In collaboration with our city region’s two universities, our businesses are driving forward cutting-edge technology and building on that reputation, ensuring that we’re increasingly becoming a place where companies want to invest, grow and thrive.

“This centre will also be a major piece in the creation of the Health Innovation Campus, a public-private partnership which will lead the way in research and drive wider growth and development across our forward-thinking city region.”

For press information: Tim Ward in the Sheffield Hallam University press office on 0114 225 5220 or email tim.ward@shu.ac.uk

Hard Brexit could have adverse impact on foreign investment in UK

A hard Brexit, favoured by some members of the current government, could have a significant adverse impact on foreign direct investment (FDI) in the UK, according to new research by Sheffield Hallam University.

Academics in the University’s Business School assessed the different possible outcomes of the Brexit negotiations and the potential impact they would have on FDI in the UK.
The research has been published following a week of key speeches by the Prime Minister and Chancellor.

They looked at four potential scenarios including current models used in Switzerland; the Norwegian model within the European Economic Area (EEA); a Free Trade Agreement (FTA), or the fall-back option of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), which would be the loosest relationship with the EU.

The research concluded that a hard Brexit, the WTO outcome, could lead to 15-20% less FDI into the UK over a 15-year time frame. The negative impact of a softer Brexit, with the EEA outcome, would be in the range of 5-10%, while with a Swiss style or FTA outcome, the negative impact would be in the range of 10-15%.

They also looked at impacts on specific sectors, including the car, technology and financial industries.

The research envisages significant impacts in the car industry, depending on the Brexit outcome, given the integrated supply chains in the sector.  Under an FTA outcome, there could also be potential challenges for the UK in terms of different product standards.

A recent study, referenced in the research, asserted there would also be a negative impact on the financial services industry, with gross value added (GVA) reduced by 5.7% by 2020 under a FTA Brexit outcome, and 9.5% under a WTO outcome.

The research found that a positive impact of Brexit could be some geographical rebalancing of the UK economy, away from London and the south east towards areas such as the Midlands and the North. This is because foreign investments in these latter regions tend to be in order to increase sales in the UK, with such investments potentially less adversely affected by Brexit.

Dr Jeremy Head, lead researcher and principal lecturer in International Business at Sheffield Hallam, said: “The Brexit vote has led to a complex and uncertain situation regarding the future of inward FDI into the UK.

“There are a range of possible outcomes of the negotiations between the UK Government and the EU, which would all have significantly different impacts on FDI in different industries and regions.

“Harder forms of Brexit will have large negative impacts on inward FDI, but even softer forms will have significant impacts in some sectors and some regions.”

 The research is an Article in press in Global Business and Economics Review.

Notes to Editor

 A copy of the research paper is available from the press office on pressoffice@shu.ac.uk

Source: Sheffield Hallam University, March 2018

 

Sheffield Hallam University welcomes Siemens CEO to business innovation networking event

Sheffield Hallam University will welcome Siemens UK’s CEO Juergen Maier to an innovation network event aimed at connecting the city’s manufacturing businesses with digital entrepreneurs.

The Digital Transformation event has been organised by the University’s Sheffield Innovation Programme (SIP) team along with colleagues from the University of Sheffield and will feature a talk by Juergen on how digital technologies can help manufacturing businesses to lead a 4th Industrial revolution.

On 15 March, The Cutlers Hall in Sheffield will host Juergen and also Mark Webber, managing director of Tinsley Bridge, who will give a regional perspective and talk about the impact of innovation for manufacturing on his business and also its importance to the city region.

SIP provides expertise, workshops and networking that help regional businesses to grow through adopting new technologies and skills. The Digital Transformation evening event comes following a two-day innovation workshop for regional digital businesses looking to find out more about how they can help manufacturers to further grow their operations

Alex Prince, head of knowledge exchange at Sheffield Hallam University, said: “We are delighted to be hosting this event, bringing together these two critical sectors and creating opportunities for collaboration and innovation, with the aim of boosting manufacturing and increasing productivity for the region.

“Juergen was commissioned by government to put forward proposals for an Industrial Digitalisation sector deal and led on the Made Smarter Review. These set out how UK manufacturing can be transformed through the adoption of industrial digital technology and play a stronger leadership role in driving the 4th Industrial Revolution.

“Tinsley Bridge is an award winning engineering and manufacturing business based in Sheffield, and will talk about their perspective and the impacts and importance of innovating for them.

“Events such as this are part of a broader innovation programme; bringing world-leading entrepreneurs, companies and technologies into the region, helping to develop economic growth and offering practical support and innovation for businesses.”

Tickets for the two day event and evening talk with Juergen Maier are available to businesses from the city region. If you wish to attend please secure your spot by visiting HERE

The event is the latest in a series of workshops hosting by SIP. For more information, please visit www.sip.ac.uk

Hallam receives funding boost to develop courses to help region retain talented graduates

Sheffield Hallam University has successfully bid for funding to co-develop courses alongside industry partners to help retain talented graduates in the Sheffield City Region.

The University received £200k from the Higher Education Funding Council for England’s (HEFCE) Catalyst Fund to develop a Future Leaders programme that will support long-term leadership development, talent retention and business growth.

Working with employers, the project will help provide the skills needed in the future economy and support the aims of the Industrial Strategy across a range of sectors.

The funding, alongside additional investment from the University, employers and other partners will be used to understand the regional challenges through research and analysis before co-designing a course to offer a solution to those barriers.

The programme will incorporate leadership, business environment, global context, connectivity and entrepreneurship.

Its objective is to identify and nurture high quality, ambitious future leaders with personal, civic and professional commitment to the region who therefore stay in or return to the region to build their careers.

Professor Chris Husbands, Sheffield Hallam University Vice-Chancellor, said: “The University’s track record is strong in co-developing curricular through co-creation with employers ensuring programmes are specifically designed to meet their needs.

“The Sheffield City Region faces a significant challenge in retaining high calibre graduates, with evidence highlighting the need to provide opportunities to further develop their skills and progression.

“This distinctive programme aims to meet that need, supporting the business community within the region to identify these recent graduates and provide a programme for them to help realise their aspirations.

“The programme would ultimately lead to the retention of talent and contribute to regional higher level skills attainment, ambitions, economic performance and prosperity.”

The bid was supported by the four chambers of commerce across South Yorkshire as well as a number of businesses based in the region.

Petra Billing, Sheffield Office Managing Partner at DLA Piper, who supported Hallam’s bid, said: “Sheffield Hallam University has been proactive in engaging with the private sector to understand businesses’ concerns and aspirations.

“We believe they are well placed to develop the curriculum that is needed to attract and retain high quality talent with the skills required by Sheffield City Region employers.”

Across the country, this funding is supporting a range of projects in many different sectors which align with the Industrial Strategy’s ‘Grand Challenges’ – from advanced engineering to data analytics, and from artificial intelligence to bioscience.

Sheffield Hallam graduate receives international recognition

A product design graduate from Sheffield Hallam University has received an international Honourable Mention Prize – the only student in the UK to achieve the accolade.

Ciara Little, who graduated with a Product Design degree on Monday, received the honour in the Product Design category of the Taiwan International Student Design Competition – a competition which sees more than 18,000 student entries from around 70 countries across 900 universities and colleges.

The Hallam student was one of just 27 entrants to receive recognition in the competition, and the only student from the UK.

Ciara′s project is A/B/O: Blood Bags; a blood type specific transfusion kit designed to prevent ′never events′ – where the wrong blood type is given to a patient, which can be fatal.

 

Ciara designed blood bags shaped like the letter corresponding to blood types A, B, O, AB, so that medical staff can quickly identify the correct bags as well as including a unique connection system which physically prevents the wrong blood type being transfused.

Ciara said: “It’s amazing to have received the Honourable Mention Prize, I wasn’t e

Professor David Swann, subject leader for product, furniture and interior, which is part of the University’s Sheffield Institute of Arts, said: “Ciara’s project is a simple but effective solution to potentially life-threatening incidents. We are thrilled that Ciara has received this honour, and the fact that she is the only UK student to have been successful is a wonderful achievement.”

For press information: Tim Ward in the Sheffield Hallam University press office on 0114 225 5220 or email tim.ward@shu.ac.uk

 

Women take centre stage for new STEM Centre opening

Sheffield Hallam University officially opened its new STEM Centre last night, naming the regional hub of excellence for science, technology, engineering and maths after a prominent female inventor.

Hertha Ayrton was a nineteenth century award winning British engineer, mathematician and physicist, as well as being a prominent feminist activist.

The £11m Hertha Ayrton STEM Centre includes cutting edge robotics, automotive, electrical and biosciences laboratories, 11,500m sq of floor space for teaching and a stunning new atrium. It is located in a prominent position directly opposite Sheffield Station.

The name of the centre demonstrates the University’s commitment to encouraging more women to take up STEM subjects – where nationally male students and professionals still far exceed female ones.

More than 200 guests from industry, education and politics attended to see the Institution of Mechanical Engineers President, Carolyn Griffiths, unveil a plaque to commemorate the event.

Carolyn Griffiths said: “It is vitally important that young people, but in particular young women, are encouraged to study STEM subjects and work in these industries. Everyone benefits from having a diverse workforce, whether that’s in the classroom or in the workshops or the boardrooms.

 

“Sheffield Hallam is a particular institution championing women in STEM; they have some outstanding students and now truly remarkable facilities with the opening of the Hertha Ayrton STEM Centre.”

As well as achieving the prestigious Athena SWAN charter status for commitment to advancing women’s careers in STEM in higher education and research, Sheffield Hallam has provided bursaries and scholarships aimed at encouraging more women to pursue a career in STEM subjects. 

Rhiannon Jones, a recent graduate in electrical engineering, who hosted the opening event said: “Having studied here and benefitted from a bursary specifically for women studying STEM subjects, I was delighted be involved in opening the new facilities. The support really made a difference, allowing the completion of my degree and a transition into a career in industry.”

Professor Chris Husbands, Vice Chancellor of Sheffield Hallam University, said: “This is a fabulous new asset for the region. It reinforces Sheffield Hallam’s place at the leading-edge of industry collaboration, teaching and research.

“Its position – at the gateway to the University – is a symbol of the importance we attach to science, technology, engineering and mathematics education for all. Naming the centre after Hertha Ayrton, a genuinely pioneering woman engineer, encapsulates the values which are at the heart of everything we do.

“Sheffield Hallam is passionate about the highest quality learning environments, giving everyone access to the best opportunities, so that all students, regardless of race, disability or gender, can flourish.”

Picture Caption:

  • Professor Chris Husbands, engineering student Katrina Love, recent graduate and event host Rhiannon Jones, and IMechE President Carolyn Griffiths
  • The new Hertha Ayrton STEM Centre

 

 

Planning approved for world leading research centre

Planning permission for Sheffield Hallam University’s new Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre (AWRC) has been granted by Sheffield City Council.

Building of the AWRC is set to start in early 2018 and it will become the centrepiece of Sheffield’s Olympic Legacy Park (OLP).

Delivered by Sheffield Hallam University in partnership with Legacy Park Ltd, the AWRC is set to become the most advanced research and development centre for physical activity in the world. The key facility is supported by UK Government, who has committed £14million of funding to the project.

Designed by HLM Architects, the Centre will have facilities such as; a 7.5m high indoor laboratory, 3rd generation pitch with cameras and tracking instruments, 3D biomechanical and gait analysis and scanning, a manufacturing workshop, MRI, CT, ultrasound, body composition measurement and physiological testing and a technology demonstration hub.

The primary aim of the AWRC is to create innovations that will ‘improve the health of the nation’, tackling key issues such as static levels of physical activity, rising obesity and mental health whilst also attracting new jobs and investment to the region.

Opening in spring 2019, it will feature indoor and outdoor facilities for 70 researchers to carry out world-leading research on health and physical activity in collaboration with the private sector. It will form a key part of the City Region’s Advanced Manufacturing Innovation District (AMID) – a 2,000 acre centre of excellence for innovation-led research and industrial collaboration.

The AWRC will undertake research focused upon taking services and products from concept to market, using the intellectual property, products and knowledge developed in the centre to generate both wealth and employment opportunities.

Sheffield Hallam’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Chris Husbands, said: “Our vision to develop the most advanced research and development centre for health and physical activity in the world is coming to fruition.  What this means is that Sheffield Hallam will be leading work which has the potential to transform the nation’s well-being.

“The AWRC will revolutionise sport, health-care, physical activity and leisure. Working in collaboration with the private sector at the heart of the Olympic Legacy Park, our talented engineers and researchers will design new products and services from initial concept all the way through to market. This is a major step forward for the University, the city and the country.”

In 2015, Toshiba Medical – a Canon Group Company, and Westfield Health were announced as the first major, private sector partners of the AWRC and will provide cutting edge equipment and technology to assist with research. parkrun became the AWRC’s third major partner in 2016 and will work together with their two million registered runners to improve their health and wellbeing.

Professor Steve Haake, director of the AWRC, said: “This will cement Sheffield Hallam’s global reputation for putting the science into sport and physical activity, but the AWRC will also be an exceptional asset for Sheffield and the wider region in helping to attract new jobs and investment.”

Sir Nigel Knowles, chair of the Sheffield City Region LEP, said: “This world leading development will be an inspiring example of what can be achieved in our region, creating jobs and boosting our local economy whilst playing an important role in tackling global problems through innovation and research. The Sheffield Hallam University AWRC at the Olympic Legacy Park will play a key role in the growth and development of the city region.”

Councillor Julie Dore, leader of Sheffield City Council, said: “The Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre will help to revolutionise sport research and innovation, not only in Sheffield but across the world.

“Creating those networks and opportunities was essential to our wider plans for the Olympic Legacy Park and will be a centre in which the city and country can be rightly proud.

“Sheffield’s world-class offer is attracting businesses, growth and city-wide investment and we are pleased that the plans can now be progressed.”

The Olympic Legacy Park will provide organisations with the opportunity to co-locate at the world-class centre of excellence and partner with Sheffield Hallam University to carry out collaborative research and development, sparking new innovations that link the health and wellbeing, sports and technology sectors.

Through the AWRC’s close links with the National Centre of Sports and Exercise Medicine, researchers will be able to work with the population of Sheffield and use local communities to explore and test the potential of new innovations and products developed at the OLP.

The Rt Hon Richard Caborn, project lead for the OLP, said “The Olympic Legacy Park is set to be an internationally recognised Innovation District for health and wellbeing research and learning, and the AWRC will play an integral role at the very heart of the site.

“Together with the National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine, this unique facility will make a vital contribution towards sustaining the health of the nation.”

The AWRC was recently highlighted as a key contributor in the Sheffield City Region vision launch which forms a cornerstone for the future of health and wellbeing in the region.

Toshiba Medical UK’s managing director, Mark Hitchman, said: “Our partnership with the AWRC forms a critical part of our strategy to invest and partner in research projects that will have considerable benefits to NHS efforts and UK population at large.

“Our imaging equipment and research and development capability will play a crucial role in identifying and understanding the positive effect of exercise on health and disease prevention, as well as faster rehabilitation of many chronic conditions.”

Westfield Health’s commercial director, Dave Capper said: “As the major private sector partner, Westfield Health is delighted with the progress being made by the AWRC, a world leading research centre which will be core to a whole system approach to population health.

“This is timely news ahead of a delegation visit authorised by the mayor of Frisco in Texas later this month, where a team are coming to see some of the innovative work being done in terms of transferring learning from elite sport to the wider population.”

Tom Williams, chief operating officer at parkrun, said: “The AWRC plays a key role in supporting us with our mission to make the world a healthier and happier place, and it is great to be involved with them at this exciting time.

“We already have excellent insight into who participates in parkrun and why they do so. If we are to achieve genuine, worldwide impact, it is critical that we enhance our understanding of that participation and our partnership with the AWRC is a significant part of that.”

 

 

Industrial strategy ‘needs to look beyond south east of England’

A report released today (Monday 10 July) by researchers at Sheffield Hallam University questions the focus of the government’s industrial strategy.

The report shows that the strategy’s narrow sectoral focus targets (at best) only 10 per cent of manufacturing and one per cent of the whole economy.

The report also says that the focus on research and development (R&D) in this range of sectors is initially likely to benefit R&D facilities in affluent parts of southern England, widening divides in regional prosperity.

The new report, from the University’s Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research, looks at the location of the sectors earmarked for funding from the government’s new Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund. The Fund has been allocated £1bn through to 2021 – by far the largest share of the new money to support the government’s industrial strategy.

The Fund is focused on six sectors – healthcare and medicine, robotics and artificial intelligence, batteries, self-driving vehicles, materials for the future, and satellites and space technology.

The report shows that many industrial cities, including Bradford, Leicester, Manchester, Middlesbrough, Nottingham, Stoke and Swansea, have few if any jobs in the targeted sectors that can expect to benefit from the new fund.

Britain’s older industrial areas – the places most in need of a successful industrial strategy – also have very few of the R&D facilities that are likely to be first in line for funding.

The report notes that even excluding its famous university, the Cambridge area (population 285,000) has twice as many jobs in scientific R&D establishments as the whole of the Midlands, more than Scotland and Wales combined, and only 2,000 fewer than the whole of the North of England (population 15.2 million).

Co-author of the report, Professor Steve Fothergill said: “It is Cambridge, Oxfordshire, the Thames Valley, Hertfordshire and London that have most to gain in the first instance from the government’s industrial strategy.

“The rest of Britain, and most of British industry, has good reason to be disappointed with what’s on offer. When it comes to financial support for R&D, much of British manufacturing is unlikely to benefit directly from the industrial strategy.”

 Please email tim.ward@shu.ac.uk if you would like a full version of the report.

 ENDS

NOTES FOR EDITORS

  1. The Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research (CRESR) has a proven reputation for high-profile, authoritative and influential research on regional development, labour markets, welfare reform, cities & neighbourhoods and the voluntary sector.
  2. The new report, Industrial Strategy and the Regions: the shortcomings of a narrow sectoral focus, by Steve Fothergill, Tony Gore and Peter Wells, is the result of independent academic research initiated by CRESR.
  3. The attached map, taken from the report, illustrates the concentration of R&D jobs in places around London.